Our reconciliation statement

Life Without Barriers believes that reconciliation must live in the hearts and minds of all Australians. As a nation we need to work together to close the gap in life expectancy by improving the cultural, spiritual and emotional well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Our commitment to raising awareness

Life Without Barriers also acknowledges Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as the original custodians of the land and strongly believes in recognising, respecting and advancing the inherent rights, cultures and traditions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities.

We also acknowledge the importance of family, cultural and community ties for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. While we are working tirelessly in practical ways to bring about real change – advocating for children and young people, improved employment and education – we also want to change attitudes.

Our commitment to raising awareness of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people by hearing their voices and recognising their achievements and shared histories in our communities is ongoing, as we work towards making sure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have access to the same opportunities as all Australians.

Uluru Statement from the Heart

The Uluru Statement from the Heart is a powerful national consensus of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander peoples on a proposal for substantive recognition in Australia’s history. The convention was held on the land of the Anangu people at Uluru in 2017. The statement was addressed to all the people of Australia, encouraging us to come together and call for the establishment of a ‘First Nations Voice’ to be codified and enshrined in the Australian Constitution.

Life Without Barriers supports the Uluru Statement from the Heart. We believe this represents a powerful and unique opportunity for all Australians to come together in support of a better future.

Our support for constitutional change

The primary source of law in Australia is the Constitution and it does not yet recognise Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as the first people of our country. The Constitution was formed from the belief that Australia was inhabited by European settlers and that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were not worthy of being recognised as members of society.

The constitutions is arguably the most important bastion that is still protecting inequality and racism in our country because it doesn’t yet codify a recognition of First Nations people.

Life Without Barriers supports a referendum to change the constitution. We believe that much positive change and greater advancement towards Reconciliation and self-determination will be possible if this important step is taken to enshrine recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in law.

Stories about our work

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