Trevor and Sandra

"The best gifts we can give our foster daughter are our love, time and attention"

Mature foster carer couple drinking tea and smiling
Carers Age
31-50
Relationship
Couple without kids
Age of Children
6-11
Type of Care
Long-term
Needs of children
General
Carers Age
31-50
Relationship
Couple without kids
Age of Children
6-11
Type of Care
Long-term
Needs of children
General

Meet Trevor and Sandra

Until a few years ago, Queensland Carers Trevor and Sandra had little interest in having children in their lives. They had never had children of their own and were approaching retirement and generally living the good life. Something in them changed however when they began to help out with the care of their newborn nephew and they thought that caring could be the next chapter for them.

Trevor and Sandra signed up to becoming foster carers with Life Without Barriers and not long after completing their training, they took an 11 year old girl into their care. They immediately knew it was the right decision and their time was soon filled with school, homework, after-school sports, family visits, play dates, cooking meals together, playing Minecraft, bike riding, as well as training and meetings with their foster daughter's care team.

Mature foster carer couple drinking tea and smiling
"If a person has capacity in their lives to give one of these children a better situation, they should go for it."

Mr Mobbs said, "The best gifts we can give our foster daughter are our love, time and attention so we've been pouring those upon her and she is thriving! Of course, there are some challenging days for all of us and there is still a long road ahead. But with our help, she is starting to see that there can be a bright future ahead for her".

Mr Mobbs said that Life Without Barriers provided comprehensive training and support to foster carers. "These kids have complicated feelings and behaviours, and the training will really help you know how to respond to that."

Since they signed up 12 months ago, Trevor and Sandra haven't looked back. "We still think it was the right decision not to have any biological children of our own, but we are definitely enjoying the opportunity to express the nurturing, parenting sides of ourselves that we didn't even know we had," Mr Mobbs said.

"If a person has capacity in their lives to give one of these children a better situation, they should go for it. It will help the child, it will help the carer to be more empathetic to others and it will help society as a whole," he said.