Foster care
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Carer guide
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Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander culture & identity
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Promoting acceptance, tolerance & positive cultural identity

Promoting acceptance, tolerance & positive cultural identity

Children who come from minority cultural groups may experience racism. Racism means people are judged on myths and stereotypes about their culture and treated as if their culture is inferior to others. If children are treated in a racist way it can have a significant effect on their confidence and self-esteem. It is important to help children develop skills to protect themselves against racism.

You can read more about racism here

Part of your role is to help children develop positive self-esteem. For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children this includes encouraging and nurturing respect for and knowledge about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture. Cultural identity is an important part of who children are. Talking about positive role models can help.

Children who are strong in their culture have higher self-esteem, confidence and expectations of what they can achieve.

Not all children acknowledge their Aboriginality. Don’t force children to acknowledge their culture but always be positive and respectful of it. Your attitude and interest in their cultural identity can help reduce confusion and negative stereotyping, and help to encourage a sense of belonging and pride.

Want to become a carer?
To become a foster carer your ability to care and nurture a child is what really matters.
To learn more, visit the LWB foster care website