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Hear From LWB Employees

We have a rich and vibrant workforce in a variety of roles and locations. Click on the images below to hear from the staff at Life Without Barriers. 

  • NT Recruitment 2
    Mel Barlow - Disability Program Coordinator

  • asmaa
    Asmaa Ahmed - Program Manager, SA (Refugee & Asylum Seeker Services)

  • kaio cygan
    Kaio Cygan - Disability Support Worker

  • cara tranby
    Carla Tranby - Community Care Support Worker (Aged Care Services)

  • NT Recruitment 1
    Leanne Benson - Disability Support Worker

  • liz
    Liz Lewry - Operations Manager, QLD

  • natasha
    Natasha Woodleigh - Executive Assistant

  • Photo of Max
    Maxwell Ihegboro - Disability Support Worker

    What was your first paid job?

    My first paid job was in a warehouse in logistics, and pick-packing and arranging things so the stores could come collect them.

    How did you become a Disability Support Worker?

    When I was growing up my grandma had a disability and I helped her a lot. Unfortunately she passed away but she’s why I have a passion for the work.

    What does a Disability Support Worker do?

    Our job is to support people with disability to achieve their goals. For example, for clients with mobility issues this might be assistance with going shopping and learning techniques or trying new ideas and ways that provide greater independence.

    What qualifications did you need to become a Disability Support Worker?

    I have a Certificate II and Certificate III in Aged Care, and a Certificate IV in Disability.

    NB: The entry qualification for a Disability Support Worker is a Certificate III in Community Welfare or similar, or willingness to complete this within your first two years of employment.

    What do you enjoy most about your job?

    My clients. It’s amazing the kind of joy you feel when you have been able to support someone and they are happy and fulfilled. It has been a worthwhile experience and I wouldn’t replace it with any other job.

    What’s a standout moment for you since being at LWB?

    There are a few stand-out moments but one of the best was when one of our clients got a job. He’d been a bit nervous about it.  He’s very independent but was unsure about working.

    What advice would you give to someone wanting to become a Disability Support Worker at Life Without Barriers?

    You have to have empathy and a passion for the job. Helping our clients achieve their goals makes me happy.  

  • Photo of Brenda Freeman
    Brenda Freeman - Aboriginal Case Manager

    What was your first paid job?

    My first paid job was as a nurse – and I stayed nursing for 21 ½ years.

    How did you become a Case Manager?

    I have always had a focus on families and children and I wanted to help my Aboriginal community. Being an Aboriginal person with  the relevant skills and experience it’s good to come into a role where you can try to make a difference and help.

    What does a case manager do?

    You work with a group of children managing their day-to-day support - education, health, whatever is required. You also support the foster carers to make sure the home is stable and the children are happy and a trusting, caring relationship is established. Working with the childrens’ birth parents is also important to maintain contact between the child or young person and family.

    What qualifications did you need to become a Case Manager?

    Case Managers require a university degree. I have a bachelor of Health Science in Public and Community Health but you can become an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Case Manager with Life Without Barriers if you have a range of different life experience and life skills.

    NB:  The qualifications for a Case Manager is a degree in Social Work, Social Science, Psychology or Human Services; and for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Case Manager (dedicated role – employees must identify as being Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander and work with Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander clients) a tertiary qualification in Human Services or related discipline or equivalent relevant experience is required.

    What do you enjoy most about your job?

    Life Without Barriers is a big organisation so you have the opportunity to move within the organisation. I like to have the opportunity to grow in my work and change, and there is that possibility of advancement at Life Without Barriers.

    What’s a standout moment for you since being at LWB?

    Taking the children away on camps and having really good quality time with them is a standout for me. You find out a more about them and make real connections, making a big difference for the children. The networking and socialising with colleagues is also terrific and makes us a strong team. I enjoy seeing the changes in the children and making a difference with them. Having those connections with the kids but also having the support of your team as well. It’s really good when you’re having bad days, you’ve got a lot of support.

    What advice would you give to anyone wanting to become a Youth Worker at Life Without Barriers?

    Please do it. Come and join and be part of a really good and supportive team and a good organisation.

     

  • Photo of Peter Stone
    Peter Stone - Case Coordinator

    What was your first paid job?

    I worked as a motor mechanic for 26 years, starting off originally helping out in the workshop and behind the counter at a local service station before doing an apprenticeship.

    How did you become a Case Coordinator?

    I’ve always liked working with people but couldn’t see how I would obtain a position in this area. I think studying definitely helped and also how to empathise more with people that are vulnerable and in difficult situations. I now work with refugees and asylum seekers.

    What does a Case Coordinator do?

    I work with around 50 clients to assist and support them to be self-sufficient in Australia. This includes helping them understand and navigate all areas of living in the community from referrals for medical issues, torture and trauma counselling, obtaining Medicare cards and engaging with immigration. We recommend support services for our clients and connect them with community links, English lessons and offer workshop at our drop-in centres.

    What qualifications did you need to become a Case Coordinator?

    I started off with a Cert IV in Alcohol and Other Drugs  and during this course was given an opportunity to attend university and study a Bachelor of Arts degree.

    NB: Case Coordinators should have a degree qualification in Human Services or a related discipline.

    What do you enjoy most about your job?

    I really enjoy building good relationships and trust with our clients and seeing them integrate into the community and the changes in attitude, and the way they speak. They’re self-sufficient and being able to see that transition is probably the most rewarding thing.

    What’s a standout moment for you since being at LWB?

    There are so many stand out moments that have occurred during my time with Life Without Barriers, but the opening the new community hub in Parramatta (in Sydney) would be one.

    What advice would you give to anyone wanting to become a Case Coordinator at Life Without Barriers?

    Be patient, open-minded and seek plenty of training in order to help clients in the best way possible.

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